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Auctions, Beginners Guides, Boundary Disputes, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, Conveyancing Quote, First Time Buyers, flipping, full structural survey, help to buy, help to buy ISA, Property Auctions, Property Market, property owner, Property Report, property searches, Quicker conveyancing, restrictive covenants, searches, signing contracts    No Comments

When we talk about ‘flipping’ we’re not talking abut pancakes! We mean buying a fixer-upper to do up and ‘flip’  (do it up and sell it at a higher price to make a profit) to boost your savings. But it’s important to remember that you have a lot to think about before you go ahead and buy a property to ‘flip’. There may be some obstacles in your way…

Do You Need Planning Consent?

If you’re planning to extend then you should check before you buy that you can get the planning consent you need for the work you want to do.  Often small extensions and conservatories don’t need planning consent, but if some extension works have already been done or your planned extension is large then you will still require planning consent from the Local Authority.  It’s always best to check this before entering into any Contract, especially if your purchase is based on being able to extend. You should also think about the costs of applying for planning consent.

If the property is a listed building, a conservation area or in an area where development rights have been restricted, then there may be even more hoops to jump through!

Building Regulations – Do You Know What Needs Sign Off?

Structural work to a property needs to comply with building regulations. There are costs of getting your plans approved from the Local Authority and extra costs for building inspectors to sign off the work once it’s completed. You’ll also need a Completion Certificate which legally confirms that building regulations rules have been complied with. As well as extensions you also need a building regulations certificate of compliance for electrical installation, gas installations, new double glazing, removals of chimney breast, removals of internal (supporting) walls and re-roofing.

What Are Restrictive Covenants? 

Even if you have the planning consent and the building regulations you need, you could still be prevented from extending or altering the property under a Restrictive Covenant. A Covenant is a legal promise in the Deeds to the property which can be enforced by a developer, a council or even owners of neighboring properties.  A Covenant can apply to modern or very old properties.

Covenants can prevent new owners making any changes to the property and owners can be sued for doing something that breaches it. It’s common for there to be a Covenant about adding a new building or extending or altering any existing building on the property without the consent of the original developer. Failure to apply for consent under the Covenant could result in the owners being taken to court, being forced to pay a fine, having to return the property to its original state or delays selling the property. Your Conveyancer who will be able to tell you whether there is any risk of breaching a Covenant in the property.

If You Have Questions About ‘Flipping’, Don’t Get In A Flap – Get In Touch 

If you’re a first time ‘flipper’ or are thinking of buying a property that have a Restrictive Covenant, then we can help you. Simply call 01623 45 11 11. For more about our Conveyancing services or an instant quote visit our website.

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Auctions, Case Tracker, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, Conveyancing Quote, Do your own conveyancing, First Time Buyers, house buyers report and inspection, Property, Property Auctions, Property Market, property owner, Property Report, property searches, purchase, searches, Stamp duty, survey    No Comments

There are a great number of benefits to buying a property at auction such as a quick completion time and often the chance of getting a property at a very cheap price. However, it’s essential that you think carefully about what will happen when buying an auction property. Make sure that you go in with all of the information you need and above all don’t get caught up in the excitement of the auction house!

There’s a lot of things to think about – make sure you do your homework!

Have you seen the property?

Don’t be tempted to make a purchase on a whim if it seems like a bargain. It is so important to view the property first and to also obtain a survey on the house to establish if there are any structural issues which could affect value or your ability to get a mortgage. There could also be a tenant occupying the property which may complicate matters for you, or the property could be located in an area which may make it difficult to sell or rent. Doing your homework first will help you to avoid problems later on.

Do you have the money?

If you succeed at the auction you will need to exchange contracts immediately and pay a deposit there and then. This is usually 10 per cent of the price of the property. You will also be required to complete the purchase within a time limit, usually around 4 weeks from the date of the auction. Once you have exchanged contacts, you are legally bound to buy the property and if you don’t complete within the stipulated period, you may lose your deposit. Be sure you have all your funds available and if you are buying with a mortgage, that you have at least your mortgage in principal in place before you attend the auction. A delay on any of your funds prove a costly mistake.

Have you read the legal pack and spoken to a specialist Conveyancer?

Each property at auction has a legal pack and this contains all the information you would obtain through your solicitor when completing the purchase of a property through the usual channels. You should obtain the legal pack before the auction and ask your Conveyancer to review it for you so they can highlight any difficult areas. This could include title issues and items revealed in the searches which may affect the value of the property and often small print which makes you responsible for the seller’s legal fees or other costs. Being aware of these issues before bidding on a property is critical!

If you want to go ahead – your Solicitor will contact the auctioneers to get the legal pack and give you a report on the contents for a fixed fee. If you then are successful at auction can be deducted from the full legal fee for purchasing of the property.

Get in touch – we’re here to help

If you are interested in purchasing a property at auction and want some legal advice simply call us on 01623 45 11 11 for further information and an instant quote.

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Auctions, Commercial, commercial property, Property, Property Auctions, purchase    No Comments

auction hammer

If you are planning to sell a commercial property at auction you need to think about the following:
1. CPSE replies (commercial property standard enquiries) these are a list of questions like the property information forms on a residential property that provides potential buyers with important information about the property such as boundaries and maintenance,  planning, environmental matters.  The issues that seem to cause the most difficulty for sellers is planning and evidence of planning permission for use along with VAT and capital allowances. It is important for the buyer to know whether VAT is payable on the purchase price, likewise a buyer may be wanting to claim capital allowances and needs information from the seller to assess such.It is better to get these answered as quickly as possible as the sooner the more information the prospective buyers have on the property.
2. Searches , in properties not sold at auction the buyer will arrange for searches such as local, drainage and environmental  to be completed. When a property is being placed into auction I would advise the seller to provide as much information as possible to prospective buyers. I would also suggest that the seller request that the buyer pays back to them the cost of the searches.
3. If the property is subject to tenancies/lease copies of the tenancies/leases will need to be provided and referred to in the contract so that any buyer knows that the property is not being sold with no one in it. Further details of the rents paid and whether there are any rent arrears will be required
It is important with an auction property to get as much information together as quickly as so that you are able to attract as many buyers as possible.
I have lots of experience in dealing with commercial properties being sold at auction and would be happy to provide you with a fixed fee quote for the work.
Please feel free to call me on 01623 448302 or email me on climb@fidler.co.uk

 

 

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