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Auctions, Case Tracker, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, Conveyancing Quote, Do your own conveyancing, First Time Buyers, house buyers report and inspection, Property, Property Auctions, Property Market, property owner, Property Report, property searches, purchase, searches, Stamp duty, survey    No Comments

There are a great number of benefits to buying a property at auction such as a quick completion time and often the chance of getting a property at a very cheap price. However, it’s essential that you think carefully about what will happen when buying an auction property. Make sure that you go in with all of the information you need and above all don’t get caught up in the excitement of the auction house!

There’s a lot of things to think about – make sure you do your homework!

Have you seen the property?

Don’t be tempted to make a purchase on a whim if it seems like a bargain. It is so important to view the property first and to also obtain a survey on the house to establish if there are any structural issues which could affect value or your ability to get a mortgage. There could also be a tenant occupying the property which may complicate matters for you, or the property could be located in an area which may make it difficult to sell or rent. Doing your homework first will help you to avoid problems later on.

Do you have the money?

If you succeed at the auction you will need to exchange contracts immediately and pay a deposit there and then. This is usually 10 per cent of the price of the property. You will also be required to complete the purchase within a time limit, usually around 4 weeks from the date of the auction. Once you have exchanged contacts, you are legally bound to buy the property and if you don’t complete within the stipulated period, you may lose your deposit. Be sure you have all your funds available and if you are buying with a mortgage, that you have at least your mortgage in principal in place before you attend the auction. A delay on any of your funds prove a costly mistake.

Have you read the legal pack and spoken to a specialist Conveyancer?

Each property at auction has a legal pack and this contains all the information you would obtain through your solicitor when completing the purchase of a property through the usual channels. You should obtain the legal pack before the auction and ask your Conveyancer to review it for you so they can highlight any difficult areas. This could include title issues and items revealed in the searches which may affect the value of the property and often small print which makes you responsible for the seller’s legal fees or other costs. Being aware of these issues before bidding on a property is critical!

If you want to go ahead – your Solicitor will contact the auctioneers to get the legal pack and give you a report on the contents for a fixed fee. If you then are successful at auction can be deducted from the full legal fee for purchasing of the property.

Get in touch – we’re here to help

If you are interested in purchasing a property at auction and want some legal advice simply call us on 01623 45 11 11 for further information and an instant quote.

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Change conveyancer, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, DIY Conveyancing, Do your own conveyancing, First Time Buyers, help to buy, help to buy ISA    No Comments

There are hundreds of law firms across the UK offering Conveyancing services, so why should you chose Fidler & Pepper for your house move?

Firstly and importantly, we’re friendly! We understand moving house can be stressful, but with Fidler & Pepper you’ll always be greeted with a smile. You’ll have the peace of mind that our dedicated teams are working hard to ensure the moving process runs as smoothly and efficiently as it can.

We’re award-winning Conveyancers. We don’t like to blow our own trumpet, but we’re really proud to be recognised in national and local awards. The most recent award added to our collection was the 2018 Conveyancing firm of the Year (East Midlands) at the Law Firm Service (LFS) awards. We’re delighted to receive this award as it is based partly on independent client feedback.

We love to create new things! We’re always creating new services and using our own technology to help you. Our clients tell us they love our 24/7 Case Tracker! With this you’ll always be in the loop, updated regularly, so you always feel on top of your case. Our Case Tracker allows you to look into you case in your own time, not just working hours. You could be anywhere in the world (with internet access) at anytime and be able to log in and see what’s happening on your case.

Our Conveyancers know their stuff. Fidler & Pepper have been around since 1888 – that’s 130 years of experience! Whilst times have changed, our values haven’t and we work hard to make our clients happy. As when you’re happy – we’re happy.

Our prices are competitive and when you instruct us to act on your behalf you’ll have a named and dedicated Conveyancer looking after your file.

Don’t just take our word for it! This is what some of our clients have to say about us

“It was just perfect and took all the worry and stress out of moving”.

“Fantastic service by Fidler & Pepper – would highly recommend! Will definitely consider using you again in the future – professional, friendly and reliable service.”

“Good Swift service, polite and helpful staff when I called up.”

“Always friendly and efficient.”

“I was very impressed. Everyone did what they said they would. I was assured by the professionalism and efficiency but also found I was treated with patience and a kind manner. An ever stressful situation made as easy as possible.”

Are we the right team for you?

We can provide an instant Conveyancing quote online or over the phone! Simply call 01623 45 11 11 to talk to one of our friendly team or visit www.fidler.co.uk for an instant quote.

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Barratt Homes, Case Tracker, Change conveyancer, Change solicitor, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, Conveyancing Quote, Do your own conveyancing, First Time Buyers, help to buy, help to buy ISA, House Prices, management companies, Property, Property Market, Property Report, signing contracts, Uncategorized    No Comments

When Would You Need To Pay A Management Company?

Some properties may have extra land surrounding them, such as a shared access, a park or just a simple piece of additional green land, which makes the surrounding area look more attractive. These areas are often maintained by Management Companies and you may be asked to pay a fee to help look after these areas. When you are buying or selling a property we may need to do some extra legal work, there may be some extra fees and delays to get this information in order.

Who Is Responsible?

The question which you may not always consider is who is going to be responsible for the maintenance and upkeep of this extra piece of land? The local authorities are reluctant to carry this out as they are already responsible for the upkeep of most roads and public spaces and therefore developers often outsource this responsibility and the cost to Management Companies.

The cost of the administration of these Companies and the works they have to carry out in order to maintain these extra pieces of land are usually shared between all the owners of the properties who use or benefit from these additional areas of land. This is usually referred to in the deeds of your property as a “rent charge”, “service charge” or an “estate rent” is another term used.

How Do You Find Out If you Have To Pay Extra Charges?

Often these extra charges will not come to light until your Solicitor is sent the deeds to the property, which could be a few weeks into the sale or purchase. The Solicitor acting for you and the Management Company may charge you extra fees for carrying out the additional work involved in the Conveyancing process and also after you’ve completed your sale or purchase. Your Solicitor will be working hard to get the right information from the Management Company as without this it can cause you delays.

Be Informed – Ask Questions And Give Information

If you’re buying – make sure you ask the current owner or the estate agents if there is any communal land which they pay extra fees to a Management Company for. This will then avoid any problems along the way of purchasing a new property.

If you’re selling – give this information to the buyer and estate agents. Also, get in touch with the Management Company as soon as the sale is agreed to pay for the Management Pack, which answers a list of queries your buyer’s Solicitors will need to know in order to avoid any delays.

Get In Touch

We have an experienced and specialist Conveyancing team used to dealing with all of the bit and bobs that happen in the Conveyancing process. We’d be happy to answer any questions you may have. If you’d like a quote for moving house then visit www.fidler.co.uk or call us on 01623 45 11 11.

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After weeks of paperwork and to do-lists you’re now ready to get the keys to your new home. Have a look at our handy checklist below to avoid any delays on moving day!

  • Make sure you’ve sent your fees and purchase money to your Conveyancer in plenty of time for Completion day.  The last thing you need is to be organising a bank transfer today!
  • Be ready to hand over or collect the keys once you’ve Legally Completed. It’s in your Contract that this should happen by 2pm – but this can sometimes be a bit earlier or later.
  • Make sure you’ve organised for all your mail to be forwarded to your new house from today.
  • Don’t forget to read your meters on your old house and your new house, make a note of the readings and call your utility providers as soon as you can to give them the information.
  • Label all your boxes – especially the important ones like “Kettle” and “Mugs” (or wine glasses and bottle opener!) so you can make a cuppa while your unpacking the less important stuff!
  • Keep a list of the items you are taking and what you are leaving behind such as curtains, blinds and kitchen fittings.
  • There could be a bit of waiting a round – Make sure you phone is charged and you are ready for the call from your Conveyancer to confirm you can collect your keys. In the meantime, have a plan and don’t put yourself in a position where your sat in a van for hours waiting for the call. Remember it could be gone lunchtime before you get your new keys.
  • No-one expects your old house to be left spotless but it’s advisable to leave it in a condition you hope to find your new one in – it’s only courteous!
  • Get your friends and family to help with packing, unpacking and cleaning.  Many hands make light work and you can always bribe them with the offer of a pizza or two for supper!
  • Keep your pets fenced or locked in or if they are liable to make a run for your old house every time you open a door. Get a friend to look after them for the day while you are moving.
  • Remember that it’s only one day of madness and you have the rest of your lives in your new home to organise and unpack. Rome wasn’t built in a day, just get the basics sorted.
  • Be flexible. Depending on the amount of people in your chain, Completion can be chaotic and there may be some waiting around. There’s no harm in your buyers moving their furniture into the living room while you’re still emptying the garage!

 

If you need advice or help from our specialist and experienced Conveyancing team – simply give us a call. We’re used to the ups and downs of moving day and are happy to talk you through anything that’s worrying you. Call us on 01623 45 11 11 or visit www.fidler.co.uk to find out more.

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Beginners Guides, Buy to let, Buy your freehold, Case Tracker, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, Conveyancing Quote, Do your own conveyancing, First Time Buyers, leasehold, Leasehold Conveyancing Quote, Leasehold extension, Property Report, Quicker conveyancing    No Comments

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What is Freehold Ownership?

Freehold means that you will be the sole owner of the property as well as being the owner of the land the property sits on and is surrounded by. This is often preferred for many buyers as you will not have to pay any additional ground rent or service charges. As the freeholder you are responsible for the repair and maintenance of the building but you will have control over when the repairs are made.

What is Leasehold Ownership?

Leasehold means that you are buying the right to use the property from the freeholder or ‘Landlord’ (the person who owns the building and land it resides on) for an agreed number of years. Leasehold is typically how flats and maisonettes are sold but is also used for houses both new and old.

If you own a leasehold flat or house you are likely to be required to pay ground rent, maintenance fees and annual service charges either on a monthly or annual basis to the freeholder. Sometimes these rents can be very low especially on very old properties but the fees can also range up to and over ₤1000 year and even more in London.

All leases are different so make sure your Conveyancer explains this thoroughly and you understand your responsibilities to the Landlord

  • You may have to gain permission from the freeholder if you want to undertake any major works on your property such as replacing your windows or extending the property
  • You may need to gain permission if you wish to rent the property out
  • Leases can be as short as 40 years or as long as 999 years – but the longer the better
  • If you require a mortgage then the lease usually needs to be to be at least 80 years
  • Leases can be extended or you can apply to buy the freehold of the property from the Landlord but the shorter the time remaining on the lease then the then more costly this becomes

Are you somewhere in the middle?

In the world of Conveyancing, there’s always another option to consider. Often freehold houses, especially on new build estates are sold as freehold but there is a clause in the title giving the responsibility to maintaining the communal areas on the estate such as shared drives, car parks and open spaces to a Management Company. Generally you would, if there is a Management Company, be liable to pay a yearly service charge to the company for its services. Remember to check the small print for any hidden costs even if a property is advertised as freehold.

Have any further questions?

Our specialist team have extensive experience dealing with both leasehold and freehold properties. Simply give us a call on 01623 45 11 11 and we will be happy to help you further.

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Beginners Guides, Case Tracker, Change solicitor, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, Conveyancing Quote, DIY Conveyancing, Do your own conveyancing, First Time Buyers, Property, Property Market, property owner, Property Report, property searches, Quicker conveyancing, sale, searches, signing contracts    No Comments

House with key icon

So, your Conveyancer keeps twittering on about ‘exchanging’ and ‘completing’ but, what is exchange? What happens on completion?  Let’s face it all you want to know is when you get your keys right?  So what are we actually talking about?

Exchange

When your Conveyancer talks about exchange they are referring to the legal ‘exchange of contracts’. In simple terms this procedure legally secures the purchase or sale. It is called an exchange because each Conveyancer has one signed copy of the contract which they exchange with each other. Both Conveyancers agree to the terms in the contract verbally over the phone and confirm the date of legal completion. Your Conveyancer is legally obliged to send to the sellers Conveyancer your 10% deposit at this stage, although in practice this rarely happens and is just held by your Conveyancers on a promise it will be sent with the rest of the purchase monies on completion. Your Conveyancer may call you to get your verbal authority to exchange for you on the day and afterwards you will need to make sure that your buildings insurance for your new property is in place from the date you move in. Make sure that you are absolutely sure before you exchange contracts as if you fail to ‘complete’ after you have exchanged contracts you will lose your 10% deposit.

Completion

This is the day you have been waiting for. It’s the day you get your keys. On the day of completion (or generally the day before) your Conveyancer will have received the money from your lender if you are having a mortgage and will send this money plus any other money due from you to your seller’s Conveyancers by way of a telegraphic bank transfer. This transfer can take anything from a few minutes to a few hours to reach the seller’s Conveyancers bank account. Once they have received the money then completion is deemed to have taken place and usually keys can be released to you at your estate agent, or from the seller directly, soon after. However the contract will often state that the sellers can take until 2pm to move out and arrange for a key hand over if they need more time.

The final part…

While you’re unpacking we carry on working on your file and will pay stamp duty and then apply to the Land Registry to transfer the property in your name. It might be a few weeks until you hear from us again when we send you the deeds to your new home.

Need help with your conveyancing?

If you would like a conveyancing quote, more information or to see our frequently asked questions then please visit our website or call 01623 45 11 11 and speak to one of our experienced team.

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Beginners Guides, Case Tracker, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, Conveyancing Quote, DIY Conveyancing, Do your own conveyancing, drainage search, environmental search, First Time Buyers, full structural survey, Property Market, property searches, Quicker conveyancing    No Comments

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Solicitors like Latin. Conveyancing Solicitors like one Latin phrase in particular, CAVEAT EMPTORThis means “Let the Buyer Beware!”

In English Law it is the responsibility of a purchaser to ascertain whether the property is structurally sound, whether there are any physical defects and also whether there are any legal issues. This means your seller is not necessarily legally obligated to reveal defects in the property.

Searches on the property you are buying

Searches are investigations that your Conveyancer carries out as part of their Conveyancing work.  They send a standard list of questions to certain authorities in order to obtain information about the property. The searches most commonly undertaken are:

Local Authority Search which gives information such as whether there have been any planning applications or building regulations applied for the property.  This can indicate whether the works done to the property were undertaken in accordance with statutory regulation.

A Water & Drainage Search shows whether the property is connected to proper drainage and a water supply.

Environmental Reports indicate whether the property is at risk of contamination, flooding, subsidence and other environmental factors.

A Mining Search may be required depending on the property’s location. You may need to have a coal, tin or some other kind of mining report undertaken to check that the property has not been adversely affected by past mining activities.

Surveys

A Survey must be carried out by a surveyor.  It is not generally a legal requirement but is very much recommended.  A surveyor can check that the property is structurally sound, whether there are any defects and even give your Conveyancer some hints as to whether they need to look into a legal matter further. A surveyor will visit the property and see it physically, in person. Remember although a Survey is not a legal requirement, because of the Buyer Beware rule if you find something wrong with the property after completion, you’re stuck with fixing it yourself.

At Fidler & Pepper Solicitors we have our own search company so we can run the searches quickly alongside our conveyancing which makes the process much easier.

Get in touch – we can help or provide you with a quote

Take a look at our website if you would like a conveyancing quote, need more information or want to see our  frequently asked questions. If you would like to speak to one of our experienced team please call 01623 45 11 11.

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Beginners Guides, Buy to let, Change conveyancer, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, Conveyancing Quote, Deposit, Do your own conveyancing, First Time Buyers, Property, Property Market, property owner, Property Report, property searches, Quicker conveyancing, Stamp duty    No Comments

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We know that moving house can be a stressful time and there is a lot of information to take in and understand. Our experienced conveyancers have pulled together a quick A-Z reference guide of the most common conveyancing terms to help you through the process.

A-AGREEMENT

The legal document you sign to agree to sell or buy the house. But do not worry nothing is set in stone until Exchange of Contracts. See below.

B-BREACH OF CONTRACT

Is if either party pulls out once Contracts have been exchanged.

C-COMPLETION DATE

The day you move out of your old home and get the keys to your new one!

D-DEPOSIT

This is usually 10% of the purchase price, which we require to be paid to us to Exchange Contracts.

E-EXCHANGE OF CONTRACTS

This is the day you DO NOT look back as you are legally tied into the deal!

F-FIXTURES AND FITTINGS FORMS

A list of things the seller has agreed to leave you.

G-GAZUMPING

Where another buyer puts a higher offer in than yours.

H-HOME BUYERS REPORT

A Survey that we would strongly advise you have carried out on the property. BUYER BEWARE!

I-INDEX MAP SEARCH

This is a search carried out to see if a property is registered at the Land Registry.

J-JOINT TENANTS

Means your share in the Property if you passed away would automatically pass to the surviving owner.

K-KNOW HOW

This is the trust you can put in us to know how to do the job.

L-LAND REGISTRY OFFICE COPIES

These are your deeds showing your ownership of the property and are held electronically by HM Land Registry.

M-MORTGAGE DEED

The document you sign to confirm you will pay your mortgage payments to the mortgage company during the term of your mortgage.

N-NEGATIVE EQUITY

When the amount you owe on your mortgage exceeds the value of the Property.

O-OCCUPIERS CONSENT

The signing of a Deed by a person living in the property who is not the owner confirming that they will move out on completion of a sale or if the mortgage company takes possession of the property.

 P-PROPERTY INFORMATION FORM

The document the seller fills in which asks lots of questions about the property, such as boundaries, alterations to the property, legal rights, utilities details.

Q-QUASI EASEMENT

Is a general legal right over land, it could be something which is used for the benefit of the property, such as right of way, drainage etc.

R-REDEMPTION FIGURE

The amount owed on your existing mortgage.

S-STAMP DUTY

Tax which has to be paid to the Inland Revenue on the purchase of a property.

T-TRANSFER DEED

The document which is sent to the Land Registry on completion and registers the property in your names.

U-UNILATERAL NOTICE

Where someone else has registered an interest on the title deeds to your property.

V-VENDOR

Another term used for the seller.

W-WAYLEAVE AGREEMENT

A deed entered into by Service Providers to install piping or cabling over or under the property for your use of electricity, water etc,

X-MARKS THE SPOT

We always mark where we require you to sign deeds and documents with an X.

Y-YOU

As our client YOU are important to us and we will ensure we do our very best.

Z-ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

Sleep easy while we make Conveyancing a stress free experience for you!

If you would like a conveyancing quote please call 01623 45 11 11 or visit our website for more information. Have a look at our frequently asked conveyancing questions or to see a guide to how the conveyancing process works.

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Do your own conveyancing    4 Comments
This subject is a bit of an old chestnut with many bar-room lawyers claiming you can save yourself thousands of pounds.

It usually follows comments like ‘Conveyancing’s dead Easy’ and ‘lawyers charge you thousands of pounds for nothing’.

With the rise of the internet letting people do more and more for themselves (I replaced the internal light in my fridge recently after putting up with a broken switch for a year – the web let me order the part straight away and it was quick and simple to replace) – some people will no doubt ask whether they need a conveyancer to do their conveyancing.

The short answer is No – there’s nothing legally to stop you from doing it yourself. Now come a list of ‘gotchas’ as long as your arm which explain why you shouldn’t do it. Before going into these you should have realised by now that our firm specialises in conveyancing. Therefore to paraphrase Mandy Rice-Davies “we would say that it’s a bad idea to do it yourself, wouldn’t we”. If that’s what you really believe then there’s probably not a lot I can say to convince you otherwise. However I’ve written this to be as plain and unbiased as I can. In the words of Nessa from Gavin & Stacey “I won’t lie to you”

So having said you can do this yourself, why would you want to?

Saving Loads of money
Hmmm – not sure on that one. If you get a conveyancing quote from our site you can see how much money we’re making on this. When conveyancing happens, especially on a purchase, there are a number of things that are paid to different parties. People who talk in pubs about paying their solicitors thousands for their conveyancing sometimes don’t realise that most of the money is passed on to other parties. Stamp duty can cost a fortune – you’ve also got the cost of searches, and land Registry fees and so on. I’ve just run off a quote for a purchase at 280K and our fee came to less than 7% of the total costs of purchase (Stamp duty’s the killer). If you do the conveyancing yourself then you’ve still got to pay all this stuff out. The only bit you’d save is what the conveyancer would get as their fee.

Making sure the job is done properly
There’s two sides to this – firstly giving your job the attention it deserves, and secondly technical knowledge on how to do conveyancing.
On the first point you’d think that your conveyancer should be doing the job properly every time. Well yes they should, but people sometimes have bad experiences with their conveyancer and the next time around think that they could do a better job themselves. In terms of giving prompt attention this may be true, in that your case would be the only case you have on, and you will make sure you respond to everything promptly – things that your last conveyancer might have let you down on. Bear in mind though that conveyancing usually involves chains of transactions and it always has to move at the pace of the slowest party.
On the second point, you’ve really got to learn everything from scratch. So as an example if you are buying and searches are included in the HIP (Home Information Pack), will you know how to interpret the results of those searches? Will you know if they are out of date, and what to do if they are? If you have to order fresh searches do you know what form to use? If potential problems are revealed by the search then do you know what to do in relation to them? You may be able to find answers to these questions, but it will take you some time. Your conveyancer should be dealing with these questions every day and know exactly what to do next in every case.
If you’re thinking of doing it yourself because of a poor experience with your previous conveyancer then I would suggest a more practical answer is to choose a better one next time.

How important is this to you
Here I’m talking about the house purchase or sale itself. For most people buying or selling property is the largest financial transaction that they will ever be involved in. It’s therefore important to get it right, as the consequences of getting it wrong could be so serious (see below on this). Now many times the conveyancing transaction will go through without a hitch – there are no problems in the title deeds, no problems with the searches, nothing revealed in the sellers property information forms and so on. It’s great when that happens. I don’t know what percentage of our jobs are just like that – I’d guess maybe 30%. On the other 70% there is something to sort out. With something that important do you want to take a gamble over £500 or so?

I don’t care – I’m definitely going to do this
That’s fine – it’s a free country. The next question to ask then is whether or not a mortgage is involved.
Buying with a mortgage
If you’re using a mortgage to help buy a property then the mortgage company will insist that you have a conveyancer acting on their behalf. If you’re using a conveyancer anyway then they will normally act on behalf of the mortgage company as well. They may make an extra charge for this to you (often called the mortgage administration fee) as extra work is involved. If you’re doing it yourself the mortgage company will insist that a conveyancer acts for them. That conveyancer will make a charge for doing this work and will expect you to pay these legal fees. The chances are that these will be as much as (or more) than if you’d instructed a conveyancer yourself. You also won’t have any choice over which conveyancer is chosen.
Selling where there is currently a mortgage on the property
This also causes problems. On the day of completion the buyers solicitor will want to make sure that if they send you the money then it is going to be used to pay off the existing mortgage first – they are negligent if they don’t make sure this happens. When Solicitors or conveyancers are involved they rely on the undertaking (promise) by the other party to do this. They can rely on that promise because if a solicitor breaches his promise he (or she) can potentially be struck off, and any loss arising from that would be covered by their insurance company. You could instruct a conveyancer to just act for you in taking the money and paying off the mortgage. Their fees for this will have to be big enough to justify them opening a file and taking on the risk – they’ll probably want to know a bit more about the situation before just saying ‘yes’ (we’re paranoid about money laundering now as well). Alternatively the buyers solicitor may agree to do this themselves, but again they may want to make a charge for this. Again this might be a higher charge to encourage you to use a solicitor yourself – by acting on your own you are involving them in extra work that they can’t charge for otherwise.

How hard can it be – it’s only a little flat!
Every conveyancing transaction has the capacity to throw up problems that need to be dealt with – some relatively simple, some incredibly serious. However there are certain sorts of transactions which are by their nature complicated. Leasehold, Commonhold, Shared Ownership, Unregistered, and new build properties are all to be avoided like the plague! OK so maybe that’s slightly overstating it, but the work involved on these sort of transactions can be 2 or 3 times the amount involved on a ‘normal’ freehold purchase. Most conveyancers will make an extra charge for some or all of these situations because of the extra work involved.
For example new build properties contain a lot of deeds because the builder has to set up and create rights for water, sewage, electricity, gas, roads and so on – these all involve long and complicated deeds which can be a nightmare to try and understand. We don’t make an extra charge for these because often when we do a good job on one we start getting referrals on other parts of the site. When you deal with other plots on the same development it takes far less time to go through everything because you’ve already had to do it for the first plot. This is a business decision that we can take in the hope of doing a few plots; if it’s your only transaction then it can be a nightmare.

Practice on a deed of gift – pitfalls!
I’ve seen it suggested that you can practice on a simpler transaction to see how things go and heard a simple deed of gift mentioned as an example. Whilst the mechanics of a deed of gift can be quite simple, even with such a straightforward transaction you actually have to bear in mind the rules on bankruptcy. If the person who is receiving the property sells it in the next 5 years then there is the potential that it could snatched back off them by a trustee in bankruptcy – they have the potential to rewrite any transactions at an undervalue in the previous 5 years which includes deeds of gift (and if they decide that the transaction was done to put the asset out of the way of creditors then there is no limit to how far back they can go). A declaration of insolvency by the seller should help with this, but I just mention that it’s an example of something perceived as simple can actually be more complicated than you think.

When things go wrong – Negligence and Insurance
This is probably the biggest reason for not doing it yourself. If you make a mistake there is the potential for you to be sued OR be stuck with a property that is effectively unsaleable (or both!). All solicitors have to have professional indemnity insurance which means that if their negligence causes a loss to the other party then they can be sued and the insurance company would pay if they couldn’t.

Summary – is it worth doing or isn’t it?
If you’ve read this far then you should know what conclusion I’ve come to – the risks are potentially huge, the time commitment can vary from 30 hours (average time for a lay person to do this) to unlimited (if problems occur), and the financial savings aren’t great.
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