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When we talk about ‘flipping’ we’re not talking abut pancakes! We mean buying a fixer-upper to do up and ‘flip’  (do it up and sell it at a higher price to make a profit) to boost your savings. But it’s important to remember that you have a lot to think about before you go ahead and buy a property to ‘flip’. There may be some obstacles in your way…

Do You Need Planning Consent?

If you’re planning to extend then you should check before you buy that you can get the planning consent you need for the work you want to do.  Often small extensions and conservatories don’t need planning consent, but if some extension works have already been done or your planned extension is large then you will still require planning consent from the Local Authority.  It’s always best to check this before entering into any Contract, especially if your purchase is based on being able to extend. You should also think about the costs of applying for planning consent.

If the property is a listed building, a conservation area or in an area where development rights have been restricted, then there may be even more hoops to jump through!

Building Regulations – Do You Know What Needs Sign Off?

Structural work to a property needs to comply with building regulations. There are costs of getting your plans approved from the Local Authority and extra costs for building inspectors to sign off the work once it’s completed. You’ll also need a Completion Certificate which legally confirms that building regulations rules have been complied with. As well as extensions you also need a building regulations certificate of compliance for electrical installation, gas installations, new double glazing, removals of chimney breast, removals of internal (supporting) walls and re-roofing.

What Are Restrictive Covenants? 

Even if you have the planning consent and the building regulations you need, you could still be prevented from extending or altering the property under a Restrictive Covenant. A Covenant is a legal promise in the Deeds to the property which can be enforced by a developer, a council or even owners of neighboring properties.  A Covenant can apply to modern or very old properties.

Covenants can prevent new owners making any changes to the property and owners can be sued for doing something that breaches it. It’s common for there to be a Covenant about adding a new building or extending or altering any existing building on the property without the consent of the original developer. Failure to apply for consent under the Covenant could result in the owners being taken to court, being forced to pay a fine, having to return the property to its original state or delays selling the property. Your Conveyancer who will be able to tell you whether there is any risk of breaching a Covenant in the property.

If You Have Questions About ‘Flipping’, Don’t Get In A Flap – Get In Touch 

If you’re a first time ‘flipper’ or are thinking of buying a property that have a Restrictive Covenant, then we can help you. Simply call 01623 45 11 11. For more about our Conveyancing services or an instant quote visit our website.

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Beginners Guides, Case Tracker, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, Conveyancing Quote, First Time Buyers, help to buy, leasehold, Leasehold Conveyancing Quote, Probate, Property Market, property searches, sale, searches, signing contracts, Uncategorized, Wills    No Comments

Happy New Year to you! Thinking about the year ahead?

As we step into a New Year, it can be a time of reflection. After
celebrating and spending time with family over Christmas, you might be
thinking about what the future will hold.

Should your New Years Resolution be to get your affairs in order?

Regardless of your age, planning ahead and putting your wishes in place will
provide peace of mind for you and your loved ones. That will certainly lift
those January blues, when the highs of Christmas are over. Creating a Will
or a Power of Attorney may seem like an odd way to shake away the January
blues, but you could be ensuring the future of your loved ones – whatever
your wishes, will be granted.

Could 2018 be the year that you buy your dream home?

Maybe you’ve been thinking of moving house and 2018 might be
the year to take action. Once you find that perfect property, we can
certainly help you with the legal side of things. Our specialist,
Conveyancing team will look after the legal (and sometimes stressful) side
of your move. We work to get things moving for you, whilst you can get on
with packing your boxes and choosing your wallpaper! Our experienced and
award-winning Conveyancing team will manage everything from searches,
deposits and signing contracts, to Exchange and final Completion. Fidler &
Pepper have a dedicated team and we’ll keep you updated 24/7 with our
secure, online case tracker.

Need a helping hand or a chat with one of our team?

If you’d like to get your affairs in order or have plans to buy, sell or
remortgage your property then come and see one of our specialist team.
Alternatively, you can give us a call on 01623 45 11 11 or visit www.fidler.co.uk

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Barratt Homes, Case Tracker, Change conveyancer, Change solicitor, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, Conveyancing Quote, Do your own conveyancing, First Time Buyers, help to buy, help to buy ISA, House Prices, management companies, Property, Property Market, Property Report, signing contracts, Uncategorized    No Comments

When Would You Need To Pay A Management Company?

Some properties may have extra land surrounding them, such as a shared access, a park or just a simple piece of additional green land, which makes the surrounding area look more attractive. These areas are often maintained by Management Companies and you may be asked to pay a fee to help look after these areas. When you are buying or selling a property we may need to do some extra legal work, there may be some extra fees and delays to get this information in order.

Who Is Responsible?

The question which you may not always consider is who is going to be responsible for the maintenance and upkeep of this extra piece of land? The local authorities are reluctant to carry this out as they are already responsible for the upkeep of most roads and public spaces and therefore developers often outsource this responsibility and the cost to Management Companies.

The cost of the administration of these Companies and the works they have to carry out in order to maintain these extra pieces of land are usually shared between all the owners of the properties who use or benefit from these additional areas of land. This is usually referred to in the deeds of your property as a “rent charge”, “service charge” or an “estate rent” is another term used.

How Do You Find Out If you Have To Pay Extra Charges?

Often these extra charges will not come to light until your Solicitor is sent the deeds to the property, which could be a few weeks into the sale or purchase. The Solicitor acting for you and the Management Company may charge you extra fees for carrying out the additional work involved in the Conveyancing process and also after you’ve completed your sale or purchase. Your Solicitor will be working hard to get the right information from the Management Company as without this it can cause you delays.

Be Informed – Ask Questions And Give Information

If you’re buying – make sure you ask the current owner or the estate agents if there is any communal land which they pay extra fees to a Management Company for. This will then avoid any problems along the way of purchasing a new property.

If you’re selling – give this information to the buyer and estate agents. Also, get in touch with the Management Company as soon as the sale is agreed to pay for the Management Pack, which answers a list of queries your buyer’s Solicitors will need to know in order to avoid any delays.

Get In Touch

We have an experienced and specialist Conveyancing team used to dealing with all of the bit and bobs that happen in the Conveyancing process. We’d be happy to answer any questions you may have. If you’d like a quote for moving house then visit www.fidler.co.uk or call us on 01623 45 11 11.

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Beginners Guides, Case Tracker, Change solicitor, Contract, conveyancer, Conveyancing, Conveyancing Quote, DIY Conveyancing, Do your own conveyancing, First Time Buyers, Property, Property Market, property owner, Property Report, property searches, Quicker conveyancing, sale, searches, signing contracts    No Comments

House with key icon

So, your Conveyancer keeps twittering on about ‘exchanging’ and ‘completing’ but, what is exchange? What happens on completion?  Let’s face it all you want to know is when you get your keys right?  So what are we actually talking about?

Exchange

When your Conveyancer talks about exchange they are referring to the legal ‘exchange of contracts’. In simple terms this procedure legally secures the purchase or sale. It is called an exchange because each Conveyancer has one signed copy of the contract which they exchange with each other. Both Conveyancers agree to the terms in the contract verbally over the phone and confirm the date of legal completion. Your Conveyancer is legally obliged to send to the sellers Conveyancer your 10% deposit at this stage, although in practice this rarely happens and is just held by your Conveyancers on a promise it will be sent with the rest of the purchase monies on completion. Your Conveyancer may call you to get your verbal authority to exchange for you on the day and afterwards you will need to make sure that your buildings insurance for your new property is in place from the date you move in. Make sure that you are absolutely sure before you exchange contracts as if you fail to ‘complete’ after you have exchanged contracts you will lose your 10% deposit.

Completion

This is the day you have been waiting for. It’s the day you get your keys. On the day of completion (or generally the day before) your Conveyancer will have received the money from your lender if you are having a mortgage and will send this money plus any other money due from you to your seller’s Conveyancers by way of a telegraphic bank transfer. This transfer can take anything from a few minutes to a few hours to reach the seller’s Conveyancers bank account. Once they have received the money then completion is deemed to have taken place and usually keys can be released to you at your estate agent, or from the seller directly, soon after. However the contract will often state that the sellers can take until 2pm to move out and arrange for a key hand over if they need more time.

The final part…

While you’re unpacking we carry on working on your file and will pay stamp duty and then apply to the Land Registry to transfer the property in your name. It might be a few weeks until you hear from us again when we send you the deeds to your new home.

Need help with your conveyancing?

If you would like a conveyancing quote, more information or to see our frequently asked questions then please visit our website or call 01623 45 11 11 and speak to one of our experienced team.

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signing contracts    No Comments

As a brief introduction, I’m Matt Slade – head of the conveyancing department. I’ve blogged in other parts of the the site but this is my first on the fidler blog.

We often get asked whether it matters if you use a local solicitor or one in another part of the country. I sit both sides of this fence so will try and provide a balanced view rather than push one point of view.

Our clients do not need to come into the office for any part of sale or purchase – no exceptions.

However some clients prefer to come into office for a host of reasons eg they prefer listening to someone rather than reading a report.

If a client wants to come into the office then we’d normally only ask them to come in in relation to their purchase (we don’t normally ask clients to come in at all on a sale only) and then it would be to go through contracts and documents on the purchase. They get to meet us face to face and ask questions that may have been on their mind.

If they choose not to come in then we prepare a written report  on the property that someone is planning to buy – a lot of people prefer this because they can read it at their leisure and they’ve got it in black and white what we’ve said – sometimes after leaving our office they might not remember everything they were told. Also meeting a solicitor can be overwhelming so sometimes it is better to settle down with a cup of tea and have a good read of the documents in your home without time pressure. If you are unsure then you can talk to person who drafted the report by email/phone. Another argument in favour of the remote idea is that that time off work is for holidays and spending time with the family rather than visiting stuffy solicitors (we aren’t stuffy).

Personally I prefer to listen but my wife prefers to read so she reads the stuff out to me and we are both happy!

It boils down to the service you want to experience and  the premium you put on your time.

Cheers,

Matt

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